Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
STATION
FBC 23
CNBC 20
CSPAN 12
CSPAN2 5
CNNW 4
MSNBCW 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
CNN 2
KCSM (PBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 87
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)
of that will not happen next year. if they resolve the fiscal cliff and the economy remains growing, although kind of sluggish -- here is another scenario, we have a loss of revenue from growth money. we are in a situation where we will prepare for the best, hope for the best, but anticipate a negative growth in the economy. liz: there is actually what we are calling the twinkie of fact. it is a negative bidder twinkie affect. there is a hostess plant where you live. how many jobs will that drop-off, as far as employment is concerned? >> a few hundred. clearly, any kind of negative constriction of the marketplace impacts us. even if it is a negative state. clearly, here at home, the good news for us is we are going at a 3.5% rate now economically. we are creating jobs. we have a healthy economy and a great quality of life which is attracting people and businesses to utah. we do not have control over what happens in washington, d.c. we are being very cautious as we go forward waiting to see resolution, out of washington, d.c. liz: i saw a quote of something you said. i thought it was perfect for wa
on ways we can solve the fiscal cliff while the same time growing this economy. the goal of this republican majority is to solve the fiscal cliff once and for all and put us on a path to grow the economy. >> we are 34 days away from what would be the largest tax increase in american history, and the speaker boehner and the republicans have put forward a balanced plan that would prevent that from happening and not devastate our economy at a time when our economy continues to struggle and people are having a tough time finding work. we need to take action that will insure that small-business owners all across this country continue to be able to survive. many have said that the president's approach in raising taxes would act to devastate the economy. ernst and young estimated jobs lost -- a plan that would cut nearly 1 million jobs is a nonstarter. we are working to find a better way. a common-sense way. we can raise tax revenue by simplifying the tax code, not increasing tax rates. we can address wasteful government spending that jeopardize an hour commitments in the nation
seemed quite comfortable of sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. two weeks ago we had a very productive conversation at the white house. but based on where we stand today, i would say two things. first, despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. listen, this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. and this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign style rallies and one-sided leaks in the press are not the way to get things done here in washington. majority leader and i just had a meeting with the treasury secretary. it was frank. and it was direct. i was hopeful we'd see a specific plan for cutting spending. we sought to find out today what the president really is willing to do. listen, i remain hopeful that productive conversations can be had in the days ahead. the white house has to get serious. yesterday our leadership team met w
. going off the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy, it will cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to avert the fiscal cliff by passing legislation to stop all the tax hikes, to replace the sequester, and pave the way for tax reform and entitlement reform. we are the only one was a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect the american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. but without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it's going to be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap, it needs leadership. it's time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they are really willing to make. i'll take a few questions. it's been very clear over the last year and a half, i talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budget. where we outline very specific proposals that we have in last year's budget and the budget from the year before. we know what the menu
on the wealthy. he says this is needed to avert the impending fiscal cliff of automatic austerity measures that could drag the economy into recession. obama said on wednesday that federal revenues will not reach the level needed to implement his proposals to cut the deficit unless taxes are raid on the wealthy. >> there is a bottom-line amount of revenue that is required in order for us to get a real, meaningful deficit reduction plan. >> obama added that if republican officials acknowledged this reality, the actual numbers proposed by each party are not that far apart. republicans have made a counteroffer. they want to raise revenue by reviewing the current tax deduke system. house speaker john boehner has urged the president to compromise. >> our members believe strongly that raising tax rates will hurt the economy. now we need a response from the white house. >> unless the two sides reach an agreement by the end of this year, the automatic tax increases and spending cuts will take effect in the new year. >>> time to get a check on the markets now. the nikkei here in tokyo rose above the
it matters to your point what happens with the fiscal cliff. the economy is at stalemate. unemployment, we look at jobs report tomorrow, is dismal. we're liking inflationary environment down the road. this is bad news. >> you could could make the argument invite blowing past short term helpful, long term payne full. melissa: spending cuts, tax hikes are very dramatic going over the cliff. when you look at numbers, still is like five to one raising taxes to cutting spending. >> that's right. melissa: no one is really talking about cutting spending. isn't that the first thing you would do? if your fiscal house was in such disarray, household at home, first thing you do is stop spending. no one is doing that. >> what scares me, is that point. whether you agree or disagree hiking taxes i am not a fan of it but i think it will come. we can get past this. charlie gasparino and i have argued this. one of the consequences of the election the president will probably get his way raising most rates. melissa: right. >> i'm not saying i'm a fan. let's get past that, let's make it happen. republicans re
statements. members of his own party seemed quite comfortable with sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. we have a dairy production cuts tuesday we had productive conversation at the white house. despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign-style or allies is not aid -- campaign-style rally is not the way to get things done in washington. a discussion with the treasury secretary was frank and direct. we hope to see a specific plan for cutting spending. we sought to find out but the president is unwilling to do. i remain hopeful that productive conversations can be had in the days ahead. but the white house has to get serious. yesterday the leadership team met with erskine bowles and business leaders about averting the fiscal cliff and achieving an approac
to avoid a fiscal cliff. to your point, you recently said, even if we reach a deal, the economy is still at series risk of a recession. >> that is right. we are looking at and economy that is very weak. growth was very disappointed. less than 2% real gdp growth in 2012. we will be struggling to achieve that next year, even without hitting the economy with more fiscal bad news. if we go over the cliff, it is really a major downturn. uncertainty remains about what is coming next. put that all together and we could certainly be put on the edge of a recession. lori: that manufacturing number coming in the low 50s, singling contraction. is that the first signal that this economy really is in trouble? >> certainly not the first signal. household earnings down. real disposable personal income has not increased since may. we are really looking at an economy that is weak. ooly thing keeping keeping consumer spending going is that households have been prepared to cut back on their savings rate to such a low level that i do not think there is more room or that in 2013. lori: there are bright spots
than $600 billion in tax increases and spending cuts kick in. the fiscal cliff potentially sending the economy into recession. the fear of the cliff. is that putting a veil over your eyes and pretending you seeing good news that could make better trades for your portfolio? you need to see the forest for the trees. to help do that, liz saunders in a fox business exclusive, charles schwab's vice president and chief investment strategist. what is the biggest mistake that the investor is making right now as it pertains to navigating that very rocky fiscal cliff landscape? >> they are trying to trade around perceived outcomes. that is fairly treacherous. we don't get a sense that a lot of investors are doing that -- [talking over each other] liz: there were buying in on the dips because they are trading around he headlines. >> there's a lot of tax related strategy happening right now, many of which make a lot of sense, but i have asked the question of loss, what would you put money on a particular outcome? i wouldn't. that is a dangerous strategy. >> one scenario could be as damaging a
's direction. "the vast majority think the fiscal cliff's impact will not be enough to drive us to recessionary measures." the chicago fed forecasts the economy will grow at 2.3% next year; unemployment will drop to 7.6%; new housing starts, often a key indicator, will increase to 950,000 new units; and vehicle sales will get a boost - all good news for the midwest. "with 13% of the population, we produce 30% of the vehicles. forecast is for 3.5% growth, which is 15 million units." also, the fed's economic forecasters say by the end of 2013, the price of west texas crude oil will rise about $4 higher than it is now. so overall, a gradual improvement - not fast enough or robust enough to greatly affect the jobs picture, but nothing on the horizon to reverse it, either. in the corporate race against china, the u.s. is gaining ground at a quicker clip. apple and exxon are among the american heavyweights moving up on the global 500 list of largest corporations. american companies now comprise roughly a third of the global list, and the market share is growing. a new study finds many low-wage work
need to have fundamental tax reform tied in to the fiscal cliff negotiations or we are never going to get anywhere on that front and that is dragging the economy down. i think taxes have to be higher. $400 billion out of medicare is about what gets cut every year anyway. medicare has been cut from the baseline every year in budgets for as long as i can remember. [talking over each other] connell: that the democrats would sign on to? what number could you get if you had $400 billion? >> something that addresses the fact that there are $40 trillion in unfunded medicare liabilities over the rest of this century. i am adding that up, $400 billion doesn't get it done. connell: have to remember these things are stretched over ten years. in one case it was 12 years and we thought was 10. steve murphy, thanks for coming on. dagen: the u.s. embassy meantime in egypt now closed amid protests in the country against president mohammad morsi. voting has started on the new constitution. kc mcfarland, formerly distance secretary of defense and fox news national security analyst, great to see you.
of his own party seem quite comfortable with sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. on tuesday, we had productive conversation at the white house. despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign-style rallies are not the way to get things done in washington. a discussion with the treasury secretary was frank and direct. we hope to see a specific plan for cutting spending. we sought to find out what the president is willing to do. i remain hopeful that productive conversations can be had in the days ahead. but the white house has to get serious. yesterday, the house leadership team met with erskine bowles and business leaders about averting the fiscal cliff and achieving an approach the white house says it wants. i made clear that we put real concessions
of the big pieces of the fiscal cliff, which actually has a way bigger impact on the economy than tax breaks for the folks at the top, and that's the payroll tax extension for 160 million americans. the nonpartisan congressional budget office says that gives you the most bang for your buck economically speaking. i believe we have to extend that for a year or come up with some alternative way of doing that. let me say a quick word about medicare reform. there's a difference in outlook. we believe we have to find savings in medicare. the president did, $760 billion, and we can build on that by trying to modernize the system, reduce costs overall in the system, not simply transfer rising health care costs onto the backs of seniors on medicare. $22,000 median income. that's what the voucher plan did. we believe we can find savings by changing the way we reimburse doctors and hospitals. not by across the board cuts, but by focusing on the value of care, the quality of care, not the volume of care and the quantity of care. >> one final bottom line question for grover norquist. in this deal, are th
of avoiding tough choices on spending and wasting time in the effort to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> it's not a serious proposal. and so right now, we're almost nowhere. >> will there be a deal by the end of the year? and what are the consequences for the economy if there isn't one? we'll ask the president's lead budget negotiator, treasury secretary tim geithner. >>> then the view from capitol hill. are democrats as divided over cutting medicare as republicans are over tax increases? with us, two voices calling for compromise. republican senator bob corker of tennessee and democratic senator claire mccaskill of missouri. >>> finally, our special economic roundtable. as both sides battle over the nation's fiscal health, what can we expect from the economy in a second obama term? what is the vision for an economic rebound? >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press" with david gregory. >>> and good sunday morning. amidst a lot of partisan rhetoric on both sides, talks on the fiscal cliff are now at a stand still, and the presi
can take action on things we agree on. it's good for everybody, the economy, fiscal cliff and it would set a tone here in washington that we can get something done when we work together cooperatively. so we've been explicit, specific. we look forward to specificity from republicans. >> there are now countdown clocks -- [inaudible] those of us who have been lucky enough to study the legislative body we have an idea of how things go. there's more and more lawmakers who look at it and say it's december 15th. if you have an agreement and have the time necessary for it to be read, digest it, debated before christmas. the president shares that timeline. it's not december 1st. it's something of a practical matter much earlier than that. is that is that in any way create a sense of urgency? >> the sooner the better that we receive specificity from republicans about what it is they would do on revenues, for example, what it is they want on spending cuts, for example. we will be able to move forward and we look forward to doing that. in terms of the congressional club, i too enjoyed congress whe
the recovery started. now, i'm not going to blame it all on the fiscal cliff. we have a slowing economy. we have slowing economies around the world. but i was at a dinner with a bunch of ceos in washington who are interested and care about this fiscal issue on monday night. and they were talking about we're not hiring. we're allowing attrition to happen. we're holding back on big spending. we want to see what happens here before we go forward. what's interesting about this is that the consumer seems to have a different view. the consumer -- for the consumer so far, this has sort of passed by. i wouldn't say blissful ignorance, but it has not affected their behavior. you had a fairly strong set of economic numbers this fall. the housing market seems to have finally turned up after a period of obviously deep decline. and so consumer confidence, which is one of our best proxies for this kind of thing, has been turning up and really does not yet -- the fiscal cliff does not yet seem to have penetrated their consciousness. for those of us who were in stores over the holiday weekend, stores are c
goal is to let this country go over the fiscal cliff because he wants the economy to fail because he wants president obama to fail. john boehner, again, i think the worst speaker ever, it's a time for leadership, not for playing political games. american people have spoken. this is a time for leadership. i think if john boehner is unwilling to lead, we've got to put pressure on him to get the hell out of the way. fish or cut bait. get the hell out of the way. he has no backbone. he has no balls. he is a lousy, lousy leader. he is a looser. i think we ought to start putting the pressure on him. let's pick a fight today with john boehner. it's not picking a fight with boehner. it's just doing something to save this country. so, peter, how do people -- i call on you join me in call okay john boehner lead or get out of the way. >> peter: if you want to send him an e-mail speaker.gov/contact. you can send it to him. if you are on twitter >> bill: speaker.gov spiritists we are tweeting this as well. if you are on twitter he is tweeting @speakerboehner,
over the fiscal cliff, there's still a worry about what happens to the economy in 2013. so broad economic landscape. >> you want to be in some high had-grade corporate bonds. i'll tell you a group that's lagged way behind this year because of concern over taxes is your master limited partnerships. these things yield 6%, 5.5%, 6%. they're down 2% for the year. these are infrastructure stocks, as you know. that's a flow through like real estate investment trust. you want to have some of those. emerging markets. listen to this, maria. china is down again this year. it's been down four years in a row. china is down 10% plus this year. china is selling right now at eight times next year's earnings, if those earnings come true. russia is selling at six times next year's earnings. china and russia would be another if this broad picture that you're talking about. you want top own some emerging markets. master limited partnerships. high-grade bonds. >> are you worried about taxes going higher on dividends and cap gains in 2013? does that cut into the reason to buy stocks? >> i think many
, today, the markets seem to be done on concerns about the swelling economy and the fiscal cliff, but this comes on a day when oil production in the united states hit another milestone. oil production last month hit the highest level since 1998, another step towards energy independence in the country, and another reason why oil prices are under pressure. the spread between the u.s. and europe, we're making a lot of progress on the oil production front, but across theeboard, we are seeing products really getting hit. oil, a feature today, down over five cents a gallon, and a lot has to do with the warm temperatures and slowing demand. other big news on europe, production coming back and crude pressing it down. the standard here, how the medal -- throwing it to sandra here, how the metals looking? >> gold and silver down, commodities in the red. gold, certainly, no two ways about it, a rough time of it lately. not just down $23 today, but dropping below the $1700 level, but despite that drop today, gold still up about 9%. so far this year, it's had a lot of volatility, but the same
brought forward this year. could going over the fiscal cliff negative impact the life-saving research that is being done and the job creation in that area? we are talking to two of the top minds in the country on this. mike milken of the milliken institute and dr. francis collins of the national institutes of health coming up with solutions to your problems and also job creation. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, uba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, ich isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ich isn't rocket science. those little things for you, life's about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for ily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability t
of the economy that is improving a little bit. will the president's plan for the fiscal cliff it it were put in place suck out the light from the housing market? would it? morgan brennan with forms magazine. here is my premise. the president wants huge increases in taxes, no entitlement reform and open season on borrowing as much money as you like. i save that slows the economy and hurt housing and you say what? >> has the potential to hurt housing especially the idea of tax increases and families making $215,000 or more. we are in new york city, they are taking them to $50,000 or more is middle class so i think if you start to take the income away your going to see americans start to full back on the home they buy. stuart: slows the whole economy and housing with as well. there is another situation. a don't know if it was in the president's plan, putting some kind of cap on mortgage interest deduction, a bigger cap then there is now. what does that do to the housing market? >> that is proposed, and from 35% to 20%. that would for a family, maybe rights of on interest deductions each year, t
to the fiscal cliff. now there is a big potential that that could have a drag on the u.s. economy going forward. ashley: sure. >> i don't think we get to that point though. i think that there is going to be a resolved. i do believe between now and end of the first quarter, now that is a ways away we get it resolved. ashley: yeah. >> i think as we approach the end of the year we hopefully get some kind of guidance by the folks down in washington they're coming to some kind of resolution on it. ashley: and assuming there is some sort of resolution, what does that do to the market? you would expect a bounce. how big of a bounce? >> absolutely. i think you will see a major bounce. you will see the market start to really recover and people investing for the next year, year-and-a-half out. what it is going to do when we get this sort of resolution it is going to clear up the concerns out there. businesses have been sitting largely on the sidelines. investors are sitting on the sidelines. you see businesses understand where their costs are going to be. ashley: actually plan. >> exactly. they can under
in serrous danger of falling into a recession. >> i think the fiscal cliff is the single biggest risk. if we avoid that, i think we have a good shot of growing. not rapidly, but between one and 2%. housing is recovering. i think without the fiscal cliff, we will do all right. lori: tax rates or than likely are going up, at least for one class. you have this slow growth. at the same time, think of the federal reserve keeping rates low for so long. we could be in serious trouble. >> on the inflation front, we are not very worried for the next year or two. it is out there, but not the next year or two. they will phase in whatever tax increase they put in. it will not hit next year. it will phase in over a couple years. that is the smart way to do it. lori: thank you for your time. >> thank you. you bet. melissa: i would like to be optimistic. date -- details of the probe have not been released. over 80 people have already been questioned about the more than $5 billion in trading losses last day. peter barnes has the exquisite details right now. peter: we first learned about this probe in septem
.6% contraction in the economy because of manufacturers concerns about the fiscal cliff that's coming up. and the report also showed that if we go over the cliff, meaning if we just go over it in the first few days of next year, that we could have a 13% cumulative contraction in the gdp between now and 2015. and 6 million jobs lost. now, a lot of those will come from small and medium sized manufacturers who just aren't willing to take the risk, but i think you're talking to doug in a little bit and larger companies like caterpillar and doug is the incoming chair of the national association of manufacturers, companies like caterpillar rely on those supply chains. so they want to make sure that the small and medium sized manufacturers are just as healthy as the larger. >> jay, thank you. we appreciate your time this morning. >>> coming up, police arresting john mcafee. the details next. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee
are not just going to go over the fiscal cliff? we heard tim geithner on this program yesterday when steve asked him, look f you don't get what you want, do we go over the fiscal cliff? he said absolutely. >> he said he would do it! >> what happens when we wake up january nd, we go over the cliff, and the world doesn't end? >> that is so irresponsible. >> you have to be a long-term investor. long-term stocks have outperformed bonds. >> with all do respect, george, are you one of those come play september investors larry is referring to? >> i'd say we're opposite of that. we never take anything for granted, but we bet accordingac. bonds are trouble. a lot of people are going to lose a lot of money in bonds. you have to be prepared for that. interest rates are going to go up. dividends are going to continue to increase. the economy in this country is strong. it's going to get stronger. >> even at 44% dividend tax? >> it's not going to go that high. >> if we go over the fiscal cliff, it does go that high. it goes to 44%. >> no, no. don't think the worst. >> less than a month, it goes there. >
effects for business travel if the economy falls off the fiscal cliff? the gbta predicts the reduced deficits and lower interest rates will lead to growth in the economy and an increase in business travel spending. >>> welcome back. now to the weather channel. reynolds wolf is standing by. what is happening around the country today? >> the story is all west. everything is taking place out west. rain, some strong winds, even some snow. some places snow getting up to around 2, 3 feet, but that is high elevation. but for the eastern seaboard, pretty quiet p. temperatures very mild this time of year. when you get into the center of the u.s., still fairly mild conditions. a bit cooler as you might imagine in spots up like towards the twin cities and even over towards chicago. but then out west, that's where the trouble really brews. it's that time of year that there's norm lay big area of high pressure that sets up off the west coast. that's gone and that allows all the pacific moisture to come through. high snow will be an issue. rain in seattle. so how is it going to affect your travel?
let our economy go over the fiscal cliff if a deal on higher tax rates for the wealthy is not reached? we're checking it out. back in a moment. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. it's easy to follow the progress you're making toward all your financial goals. a quick glance, and you can see if you're on track. when the conversation turns to knowing where you stand, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. >>> welcome back. this very public negotiation on the fiscal cliff still does not seem to be closing in on a deal. the white house out in campaign style events regularly, making multiple media appearances, kle including timothy geithner right here in 25 minutes. >> but would things be done faster if it was done privately? in his latest column, jeff goldfor a compares u.s. budget talks to merger proxy battles. jeff joins us to explain about that. plus, we have bob from jones day who
in our economy. once we resolve the cliff, we need long-term fiscal reduction so that businesses can climb to the future. to get families and businesses certainty, we must agree in the next few weeks on specific spending cuts and specific revenue increases that reduce the deficit to avoid the fiscal cliff. we should not put off the hard decisions with gimmicks or with triggers. that is what got us here in the first place. it is time to bite the bullet and make the tough decisions and make them now. the first thing we should do is immediately and permanently extend the middle-class tax cuts. this will provide needed certainty to america's families and businesses and markets. this decisive action will ensure millions of american families do not see a tax hike of more than $2,000 starting next month. any agreement must also include a long-term extension of the debt ceiling. america cannot afford another debilitating fiscal showdown. has to be a package deal. then we need to enact a long term and, granted the solution. the most serious plan to recommend $4 trillion in deficit reductions
to avoid the fiscal cliff before the end of the year or not, our friday market monitor thinks the economy and the stock market will climb higher next year. hank smith is the chief investment officer of haverford trust, managing $6.5 billion. so, hank, for investors now, will it pay to wait and see? in other words, should they not buy anything now hoping that there's some kind of conclusion before the end of the year? >> well, tom, if they're already invested, stay invested. this is too trick tow try to trade around. but if you do have cash and we have a sell-off because congress fails to bridge this fiscal cliff, we think it will be an extraordinarily good buying opportunity and you should be able to take advantage of that. >> tom: when we saw the first tarp legislation fail in the house, the s & p 500 lost more than 8% in a single day. could we see tha kind violent reaction? >> oh, absolutely. and, you know, it will be the market's way of saying to congress, "ladies and gentlemen, you made a mistake. let's get back into session and have another vote on this." because the full effects of
fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. if you look at the markets worldwide and the economies and the auto industry, nearly a third of the market will be north and south america. a third will be europe and russia and africa. and about a third of the market will be asia pacific. and in china's case, to your point, china now has replaced the united states as the largest auto market. the chinese veitremendous respe for history. they know about henry ford and lincoln. so we'll be bringing the first lincoln vehicles to china in 2014. >> alan mulally, ford president and ceo. thank you for coming on. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> now this. an infant left without her parents after an nfl player just snaps. and now as a city mourns, sportscaster bob costas goes off on gun control. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. >>> if syria's chemical weapons are on the move, who's watching them? and where do they end up? >>> plus, as eight more people die in chicago -- >> we walk through a front door that was wide open. you can see the equipment is here. this was defunded by the program because they couldn't fi
sales, the economy and of course the fiscal cliff. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. >>> welcome back to "squawk
the fiscal cliff could cause major problems for state economies. which face the biggest threat from the potential tax hikes? joining us on the phone is laura porter, managing director at the public finance department, sector head for the state ratings group which focuses on state credits across the country. and focuses on a report, laura, looking granularly at this. good morning. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> in general, you argue that a lot of ratings on the state front will remain unchanged no matter what. why is that? >> we feel states are fundamentally very strong credits, have strong control over their revenues and spending and the vast majority have shown the ability and willingness to adjust. so we think that the biggest and immediate threat is the fiscal cliff and what that can mean for state revenues, which quickly react to changing economy. >> you make the point -- surprise to no one, you have an unusually high degree of uncertainty in this outlook and that's because -- walk us through a scenario. we go over the cliff, and we begin seeing materially lower reven
to think about these events, but a very traumatic and serious. they avoid the fiscal cliff. we are talking about over $607 billion worth of money taken out of the economy next year. lou: i just want to put up the next cartoon that we have. it matters not which one you select. but this is one of my favorites. the debt commission saying it is very difficult. is very complicated and then cut spending. i don't think you could have cut better on to the essence of the issue. the absurdity creating obstacles to that resolution in washington d.c. >> but the problem here is that frankly there is a fine and out of capital that can be used up their divided either in the private sector which creates businesses and jobs and federal revenue or given to the government which is just a bureaucracy and creates nothing but bureaucratic management. if you look at the last gop congress and the expenditures, about two and half trillion dollars and now the president's proposals are about 4 trillion in spending with deficits and increased. it is the economy. lou: it truly is. and i want to also if we may put up t
? is it geopolitical or more of a story about what's happening in economies around the world? >> merry fiscal cliff-mas to you. you're going to see more bouncing like a yo yo, on the fundamental story, the models we have pointing going into 1q, the reason, it sort of rhymes in the spirit of the season. you have non-opec demand growing, global demand slowing, it's not snowing, and down is where we're going. the next big data point is probably the iaea report in february. and if that implicates more progress toward an iranian bomb, there's significant risk to look to the upside. in the meantime, you have a lot of other issues beyond the fiscal cliff. debt ceiling issues, if not resolved in the negotiation looming. and relatively long stocks here in the u.s. perhaps the most interesting part, becky, is to look at the convergence between light and heavy grades here in north america. we have a lot of light oil. and we're actually potentially short of heavy oil. so seeing convergence within that downward trend means there could be a bid for heavier. >> you would guess that would certainly hurt demand. >>
he cannot promise we won't go off the fiscal cliff. speaker boehner says he is doing everything he can to avoid the cliff but acknowledged that there is a chance we will in fact go over the edge. >> thank you. >> shannon: now if the country does go over the fiscal cliff marx worry there could be cutback to entitlement programs like social security and medicare and programs that the government uses to keep you healthy. joinings now, registered nurse and republican congresswoman from tennessee diane black. former california insurance commissioner, democratic congressman john giramendi. welcome to you both. >> good morning. >> thank you for having us. >> shannon: something to keep an eye on the issue of doctor reimbursement fee under medicare. if nothing happens those will drop by 27%. come january 1. we know ra lot of doctors are limiting the number of medicare patients they will take in. if they don't get the numbers up what happens next? >> this is why we need reform over medicare. we know we are not going to cut doctors by 27%. if we were to do that, there would be no access for s
a 39.6%. that's the washington post this morning. below that, governors say the fiscal cliff would hurt their states' economies. several governors met at the white house yesterday and with political leaders to say something needs to be done or their economies and on the state level will be heard. -- be hurt. let's go to walter in new jersey, independent caller. good morning. caller: good morning. i don't know what's wrong with these people, because they have to come to some kind of agreement. the gop has to give ground, taxes wouldybody's go up just to save 2%. it just does not cut it. it is a bad move politically and bad for the country. host: polloi in johnsonville, virginia. -- floyd. caller: i was thinking about the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's the problem at. the problem is when we fell off the moral cliff. our president said gay marriage was ok. and america killing so many babies. side,e get back on god's everything else will take care of itself. that's the way it is. a guy said it seemed like christians are down and out. let me tell you, christians are the happiest people t
in gold. i don't know why it would end. i didn't find -- look. maybe you think that we go to fiscal cliff and it's so deflationary that no one wants to own gold. you could argue that this is a return to the great recession. i don't know. in terms of slowdown in the economy and why inflation is dead. inflation would be dealt a mortal blow if there was inflation by going over the fiscal cliff. austerity does not breed inflation. >> do you believe that sandy is a convenient excuse here for these adp numbers? >> i think sandy was terrible. goldman upgrades waste management today. anyone who has ever been to the giant dumps that waste management has, it's where you dump -- dumping is an expensive thing. when you're a contractor and you have to clean up sandy of which there's immense damage, waste management gets a cut of everything. i think sandy is gigantic. the ripples continue to come. i think new york is going to be hurt very badly by sandy. >> let's move onto starbucks. starbucks today brewing more than coffee. world's largest coffee company announcing during investor day today it plans t
direction. host: and that was the new g.o.p. conference secretary voicing her thoughts on the fiscal cliff negotiations yesterday. and we want you to address the issue of what the g.o.p. is raising, which is address the spending problem. 202 is the area code for our numbers. that's our question this morning in this first segment of the "washington journal." you can also contact us via social media and email. you can make a comment on our facebook page, and finally send us a tweet. here is the hill newspaper from this morning. g.o.p. forget tax rates in talks on the deficit, let's look at the spending. the speaker's swift rejection of an idea floated by representative tom cole of oklahoma, a respected party strategist and former chair of the house g.o.p. campaign committee came as the republicans voiced increasing concerns over the debate of the so-called fiscal cliff. boehner said it's time for them to get serious about the spending problem that our country has. republicans complain that for all the talk of coming up with a balanced budget plan, he has made little effort to identify specif
, the economy, if, in fact, we do go over the fiscal cliff, taxes will go up, major spending cuts will kick in. this weekend republican south carolina congressman seth graham said he thinks that we're going to go off the fiscal cliff in fact and he said this, i think we're going to go over the cliff, it seems to me that they made a political calculation. this offer doesn't remotely deal with entitlement reform in a way to save medicare, medicaid and social security from imminent bankruptcy. senator richard blumenthal is a democrat from the state of connecticut. he joins us this morning. >> good to see you. >> you heard lindsey graham saying he thinks we're going off the cliff. you think that's true? >> i respectfully disagree. i'm really encouraged that we can avoid this fiscal cliff for a number of reasons. first of all, there is a growing group of republicans who say we really need to raise revenue, not just talk about raising revenue, but actually increase taxes on the wealthiest 2%. and they're willing to consider those kinds of taxes that the president proposed so that middle-class americ
fiscal cliff issue that one of the main areas of the economy of really the country that is going to be impacted after january first is donations to charities. i know you have some thoughts about that, about that concern and how we may have to get the message out that this is such an important focus. tell us about that. >> it is a really difficult question. certainly all of us are looking, you know, potentially as a really big thing. i think what are we going to be left with? we have to look at the bigger picture and say if we are investing in some charities we are investing in our community and we are investing in ourselves. i don't want to see that go away. this is making your world a better place for all of us. >> this great group, these are people that volunteer their time, their efforts and really their hearts. it is so uplifting. i know you probably agree. we talk so much about the negative things. what a great story and great positive event. >> it is an honor to have him here on the floor and for the event tonight. thanks so much. still to come the ceo on holiday season sal
in congress hinted they were optimistic about a deal over the so-called fiscal cliff. the euro is edging higher against the yen and that's changing hands at 106.24-26. let's take a look at stocks now. tokyo share prices are edging higher as concerns about the u.s. economy are receding. the nikkei average at 9371, a gain of .7% from wednesday's close. export-related issues, including automakers, are leading the market advance. and taking a look at other markets open in the asia-pacific, we're seeing south korea's kospi trading higher by .9%, 1929. and in australia, the benchmark index is trading higher by .4%, 4465. we'll see where china takes us in the next hour. >>> countries around the world are accelerating moves to solidify trade relations. among them, japan and the european union are seeking an economic partnership. but france's trade minister says yeahn pa will have to meet certain conditions before that happens. eu trade ministers will begin discussions on thursday on whether to approve the start of negotiations with japan for an economic partnership agreement. japan would have to
's economy goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. the white house and congressional republicans said to be deadlocked. president obama released his plan. it includes 1.6 trillion dollars in new tax increases. 50 billion in new stimulus spending. and stimulus, and new power to raise the debt ceiling without congressional approval. tim geithner, john boehner appearing with chris wallace on fox news sunday. >> we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to get this question resolved but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. they have actually asked for more revenue than they have been asking the whole entire time. >> in kind of a tough position now. it is going to be, obviously a little hard for them now. they're trying to figure out where they go next. we might need to give them a little more time to let them go next. we did what you expect from us. we laid out a very detailed, carefully designed set of spending savings and tax changes that help put us back on a path to fiscal responsibility. bill: where are we
. appreciate it. the battle over the fiscal cliff, certainly heating up. house speaker john boehner says the two sides are at a stalemate. no big surprise. while president obama says the only thing holding up the deal is quote a handful of republicans. here we go again. peter barnes in washington with the latest on the stalemate. peter? >> that's right, ash. speaker boehner said a stalemate, quote, let's not kid ourselves for punctuation. he and the president were both out in front of cameras today to try to convince voters that both of them are ready to keep talking. >> i'm willing to move forward in good faith. our original framework still stand. instead of raising tax rates we can produce similar amount of revenue, reforming the tax code to close loopholes and lower tax rates. >> this is not some run-of-the-mill debate. this isn't about which political party can come out on top in negotiations. and all of us will have to get out of our comfort zones to make that happen. i'm willing to do that. i'm hopeful that enough members of congress in both parties are willing to do that as well.
? >> it was not. i like the management of dolmen. >> how is cantor positioned for the fiscal cliff? are you just strapped in and ready to go over the other side. >> i think taxes will go up, twll be a lot of conjecture overs next 30 days or so, and then tell get a reality to that we have a problem, we have to tighten our boot strap, figure out how to actually inject money into the economy and how to cut some of the costs out of our government. >> you want to inject money into the economy and cut costs at the same time. how do you do that? >> certainly you look at the perspective you'll raise taxes on the higher end, but you're also going to have to cut some of the fat in the government. and that takes time. we need corporations to actually drive us out of this problem. the government isn't the solution here. >> the government is not the solution. >> correct. >> well, they are part of the problem. before a private sector solution, it seems like we have to get over this problem in the near term. it's a huge amount of money just being sucked right out of the economy on january 1st. >> i don't disag
discussing the fiscal cliff. i think the shared concerns of governors that we address are fiscal challenges in a way that ensures the economy continues to grow and create jobs. with that, i'll take your questions. >> thanks, jay. two questions. in the bloomberg interview, the president was asked whether tax rates on the wealthiest americans have to go to the clean ton levels, 39.6% now. is that a red line? he never answered it directly, a process where rates could go down next year as far as tax reform. you talked with fiscal rates need to go up. what he campaigned on was the 39.6 at the end of the year. is that the case? >> so, let me say this, the president has been absolutely clear, as have i, that rates have to go up on top earners, on millionaires and billionaires, those making over $250,000. the president made that clear all yearlong and clear in the post-election period being engaged in conversations with congress about how to deal with the fiscal cliff, and our long term deficit challenges. we have yet to see even an acknowledgement of republican leaders of the fact that there is no
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)